Sh*t I Never Knew: Bedline All The Things


– Hey guys, Shawn! With Custom Offsets, Custom Offsets TV on the YouTube. We have a shoot I never knew. People have been asking, I keep
scorpion lining my vehicles. People have started commenting on, they’re wanting to know more about it. This isn’t our typical wheelhouse, see what I did there, Fuller? But, I figure we might as
well answer the question, ’cause you keep asking it. So we’ll make a quick
video, shoot I never knew about scorpion lining,
rhino lining, linexing, basically bed lining a vehicle and why the hell I keep doing it, so, I’ll start with the one I did first. The Custom Offsets Avalanche
was originally plasti dip. So I plasti dipped this
entire truck, top to bottom. It went on really well, I did it myself, it cost me $600, I loved it,
it lasted for like two years, and I was waxing the hell
out of it and everything. It kept the matte shine to it. It actually worked really well. Then I went to remove it,
because plasti dip is so, it’s easy to remove, well, I must not have done it right
because it was a nightmare. I’ll never plasti dip anything
big again in my entire life and I’m still upset about it
and that was two years ago and I still don’t have any fingerprints from removing all of that plasti dip. So, when I redid it I
decided to use bed liner. In one of my concepts, and
this is a scorpion liner. They’re one of the ones that
lay it a little more flat, so, Fuller, if you come kinda
get a close up on that, you’ll see that it’s not very rough. It’s got a texture to it
but it’s almost closer to a plasti dip texture. It’s got a little bit of roughness to it but it’s not like the
real rough bed liners, and that’s why I kind
of chase the scorpion. And then it’s got a matte look to it, and then on the bumps it’s got a sheen. So it’s kind of matte, kind of shiny. It’s hard to explain, but
hopefully you’re following me. And, so, I went and had them do this and when I did it, I literally
had them shoot everything. We went in and we shot the tow mirrors, and we shot inside the door jambs. So you’ll see we got real close to getting everything in the door jambs, and then also the inner doors. So we got all of this area here, and that made a big difference. This is a white Avalanche. So I think it would’ve looked terrible if we would’ve left this white. When I plasti dipped it I left these white and I always yelled at my wife when she would open the doors at shows, because they would see the sins of not doing the jambs, so, it was a must that we did the jambs. And we did these, and they, I mean they close and operate great. The build up of the
liner didn’t do anything for function and fit, so I’ve
been really happy with it. As you can imagine we had to remove all the taillights and signals and pull all the bolts
out of it and everything and re-put them in with
all the RTV sealant. And then the other thing we did is we went right over the top of the plastic. If you have an Avalanche, I’ve had a lot of Avalanche guys say they’re gonna just get
their plastics bed linered. I highly recommend it, it doesn’t have the fade problem anymore. But be careful when you’re scuffing it, because any deep scuffs into the plastic and you actually see them
right through the liner. Even though this builds up pretty good, you still see any imperfections
through that liner, so don’t think you’re
gonna take a beat to hell, scratched up, gouged truck,
either plastic or metal, liner over it, and you’re
not gonna see that. You will see the scrapes and scratches. So you do wanna prep it, just like you would if you were painting, or at least close to that. I did the covers on this thing. I did literally everything in the liner so that it would be durable. So, the cost on a truck like this, because it doesn’t have a
lot of stuff to take apart, most of it was able to
pull off pretty easy, and then they did the entire vehicle, is right around $2000 bucks. If it were a pickup truck
where the box has to come off, so you can do the back of the cab, I think he said it’d be
around the same price, about $2000 bucks,
installed, sprayed on there. I think you should be able to find a price like that anywhere. That seemed like a pretty
typical price point. So this is the black one, and that’s a pretty standard color. With these liners you can
get all different colors. So they’ve got a huge color pallette, and then you can start
getting custom mix colors, but then you’re gonna
start spending money, ’cause each of those
containers of the pigment or whatever starts to increase the price. So, when I went to do the Hummer, they kind of thought it was
gonna be around the same price, and then shit got really weird. So, same thing. You’ll see that we did this one, this is also scorpion liner. I think it added like $500
bucks to do a custom color, ’cause I really wanted it to match our building the best I could. Really going for the gray and black look. Again, I did inside of
all of the door jambs and inside of the doors. This used to be a yellow Hummer, so it’d have been real obvious, and I’ll show you some
spots where we didn’t do it that it really stands out. So I wanted to make sure and
do the jambs really good, but because it’s got a
lift gate and these vents, and lots of marker lights and roof lights, there’s lights for your lights, the whole lift gate had to come off. They had to remove anything
that they weren’t gonna liner. I didn’t do the step up bars and I didn’t do the plastic down here. On the mirrors I just
had them do the insert, so that was an area that
they had to tape off. And then, in the engine bay, because the Hummer’s got a nice, rectangular engine bay
that’s sealed from the hood, I just literally had them tape this off and then not do inside the engine bay, ’cause you don’t see it when the vehicle’s all put together, ready to rock and roll. For that reason, that’s
what the yellow looks like, and then that’s where I stopped. You could definitely get in there, but that wasn’t my cup of tea. But they had to remove the hood. They basically said, and, I mean, all of this stuff had to come off, so they basically said by
the time they were done, they will likely never do an SUV again, at least not a Hummer, because of all of the pieces and parts. This one, they said, would
probably be around $3500 if anybody else wanted to do it, because they learned
their lesson on this one. So, if you look close on this one you’ll see that this is, So, this, because of the charcoal, or the gray, is all sheen. So you’ll see it doesn’t quite have the flat that the black carries, ’cause that flatness comes from the black. And then this one, with the pigment in it, actually gave it a sheen. But I keep it dirty, so then it still looks
more of a matte look. So, cost almost $4000, with this one, with all the pieces and parts, and it’s a huge vehicle,
and they had to do the roof, and pull the roof racks
off and everything, and then about two grand for that one. Plasti dip on these would’ve
been probably $700 bucks and probably, you know,
almost a thousand dollars, but you would have spent time. And it’d have been almost impossible to do the door jambs and everything without taping everything off, so. What he basically told me,
and what I’ve learned is, when you’re lining, you
basically have choices, right? Plasti dip, which, you’re not
gonna spend as much money, but you’re gonna have the problems and it’s not gonna be done as well. And then you could do a wrap. To me, a wrap on this vehicle just wouldn’t have had the durability. I plan on beating the
piss out of this thing, and this is kind of my
winter vehicle slash my “go up into the North
woods and wreck it” vehicle, and that’s why I put the wheels on it. They look fancy, but they’re actually a used
set that I had sitting around that I’ve actually knocked
some chrome off of already and that’s the plan, is
to get them powder coated, once I get them nice and racked. That’s why we’ve been doing winter wheel experiments all winter. This vehicle, I wanted to be durable, and that’s what the liner is. I mean, there’s no doubt. Somebody egged it this last weekend, which was really funny, ha ha. But it didn’t do anything. I just went with a hose and
washed the egg off of it, so it’s anti-egging capabilities. Right, Fuller? ‘Cause I’m pretty sure
you’re the one that did it. So, what else was I
gonna tell them Fuller? Tell me more? I think I’d better go to my cheat sheet. And then optionally, we have paint. So, what they said is
you basically could’ve painted this vehicle for
the same price we lined it, because it’s the same process. You still have to prep everything. You still have to take everything apart, then you have to put it all back together, and then the taping off and everything. All these side vents had to come out. Everything had to come out of here. So this one was the same. That one was definitely cheaper. I don’t think anybody would
totally do a color change. Oh, this reminds me of what
I wanted to tell you about. For $2000 bucks, so I would
say this is cheaper than paint, more expensive by double than plasti dip, but this is gonna last forever. This is going nowhere. This. So, the paint had some bubbling going on, some rust starting to creep out, so when I did the liner we had them go ahead and use some preventers to try to stop that rust and grind out what they could. I didn’t have them cut it out and weld it. Going back I wish I would’ve. We had hoped that that bed
liner could hold it back. It held it back for about three weeks. In three weeks the rust was
already bubbling through. So now what I do is I just
spray plasti dip on there and I’ve got probably
three and a half inches of plasti dip on here, which is really odd and I
wouldn’t recommend it to anybody, ’cause that’s just a poor
way to take care of things. But that would be an example
where it won’t stop rust, it won’t get rid of rust. It’s gonna bubble right through it. So don’t have that false hope that you can take your old rusty truck and cover it in bed liner
and nobody will know. It’ll just hold it together
like some magical glue. It’s gonna come right through there. And that came through
the plasti dip, too, so. I’m checking my notes, Fuller. Oh, cleaning, you wanted
me to talk about cleaning. So, as far as cleaning these, I like to just take them
and power wash them. Sometimes I’ll use the, you know the brush at car wash that you’re never supposed to use, especially on your painted vehicle? That is perfectly awesome on
a truck that’s been linered. But I just power wash these things and then get right back to it. The little bit shinier, and this one’s a little
bit more knocked down, too, ’cause I told them to keep
it as flat as possible. This one, I can actually go
around it with a spray detailer and it works really well. That one is a pain in the butt and it rips up all the rags, ’cause it does have a
little more texture to it, and it’s got that matte so it, you end up seeing all the white marks if you try to use the detailer. So I pretty much just stick
to power washing on that one. I think that’s it. You guys just kind of asked why do I keep linering these vehicles and I figured I’d give you a
run down on some of the costs. Let us know if you have any more questions that I can try to jump on, or Fuller, some of the guys will help out, and we’ll answer any other questions, but, it’s not really a cost savings, it’s more about durability,
you want it to last, and the bad ass look of having your entire truck bed linered, and the fact that kids will
ask you if it’s bulletproof and you can actually
convince them that it is. – Is this bulletproof? – Well, I hope so. The way this world’s going. (laughter) Peace. (heavy music)

100 thoughts on “Sh*t I Never Knew: Bedline All The Things

Leave a Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *