RIGHT WRIST ACTION IN THE GOLF SWING


– Welcome, Adam Bazalgette
here in Naples, Florida. I’m two time PGA teacher
of the year down here. Today’s subject the right
wrist action in the golf swing. Stay tuned. (inspirational ambient music) So, right wrist action in the golf swing, obviously, it would be the opposite for the left hand or the trailing wrist. Let’s have a look at that. We’re gonna have a look at
kind of an interesting thing. How it sort of does the
opposite in the backswing, verus what it does in the downswing. It can be kind of a useful pair, sort of a playing thought, if you like. If you like this video, please
subscribe to the channel. We’d love to get you more free content. Scratchgolfacademy.com is my home website. Have full courses in
every aspect of the game, including how you can do one on one internet instruction with me. Let’s get started. (golf club swooshing) So let’s talk about the right wrist, the trailing wrist of the golfer, would be left for left-handed. And what you’ll see is
an interesting fact, that it looks very different in the early part of the backswing, from how it looks in the downswing. And it makes a lot of
difference to your swing play, how in a little while
we’re gonna have a look at how it makes a difference
to your power as well. Let me show you a few
great players in action, so you can see this. So there’s Bubba Watson as he sets up, there’s his take away, and now watch as he
comes into into it back, that trailing wrist is a lot more bent. How ’bout Nick Price,
there would be take away. Approaching and back,
a very different look. Take away, approaching and back. Look at how much more bent than cocked backwards that right wrist is. Couple more quick ones. Henrik Stenson, love to be
able to hit the ball like him. And approaching contact, take
away, approaching contact. And then, finally, Jason Day, again very different look there. So, let’s see how that’s
effecting the play. So, why does this happen? Well, it happens not because the golfer’s artificially trying to do
something with their wrist. It happens because the club is responsive to the core of the body. This is a cornerstone of good golf. And when the core starts up as it should, and it begins the backswing, if the right wrist is passive the weight of the club will
cause it to stay fairly flat. And conversely, if you
picture say skipping a rock, or something like that, the
natural motion and loading of the object you’re trying to throw, or the golf club of course in this case, will cause the right
wrist to bend coming down. So, it’s really something that happens as a reaction to good swinging motion. Let’s say, in this case,
as a reaction to the core leading the club, and the club
being reactive to the core. You don’t want to try to fake this. Let’s have a little bit of a look at how it effects power now. So as we look at this from
a standpoint of power, what you’ll notice again,
if the club is responsive, the right wrist is flatter going back. And then, as you change direction, add the angle coming down. Of course, that’s something
all great players do, and all that lag allows
you to hit it with power. Let’s just have just a quick look at a couple of great players in action. Then we’ll give you a few drills, and thoughts as to how you can do it. So, how about Adam Scott? There he is with a middle to long arm, take away, approaching contact, take away, approaching contact. And then let’s have a look at
the late great Arnold Palmer, a little tribute to him, well worthy. There’s take away. There’s approaching contact. Take away, and again approaching contact. Okay, so let’s start
on a small scale here. I’ve chosen a nine iron. And one of the keys
when you do this stuff, is you just can’t think
and try to over control it. I’m not trying to manage my right wrist, and force it to do things. You’ll never have a lot of freedom, and hit the ball well doing that. I’m just starting to feel how it responds, but that mental picture of flat responsive wrist,
bent responsive wrist, that mental picture really, really helps. So, we’ll do it on a small scale, couple of little nine irons here, and just punch it out there. And again, I can actually
feel the weight of the club trailing and loading as I go, like so. Let’s check it from this angle. So again, sticking with my
nine iron, little swings. I’m trying to feel that reactive position without being too soft and
too jelly like, if you like, but still being able to feel the motion of the golf club
in response to me here. We’ll start on a small scale, and you can just sort of see how that club’s reacting
a little bit there. You just have to work on it a little bit. This is something, honestly, you can work on at home
in practice swings. You don’t need a golf ball
to get better at this. And again, what I like so much about this, is it’s an easy, easy playing thought. Flat to bent or however
you want to describe it. And just remember, don’t over control it, keep your mind clear. But if the image is clear, your body will start to
respond properly to it, and it can make real, real difference in not only your playing, but your power. You’ll play some good golf, if you can master this fundamental. So, I hope that helps you with right wrist action in the golf swing. Kind of an interesting pair there. If you like this video, please
subscribe to the channel. Would love to get you more free content. Scratchgolfacademy.com is my website, and there we discuss full video courses in every aspect of the game, and how we can do one on
one internet instruction. Thanks again.

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