Monster magnet meets monster magnet…


Hi, and welcome to another of
my mad magnet experiments. This will be my craziest so far.
I’m sure you haven’t seen this before. I’ll attempt to combine
two 6×2″ neodymium magnets. Magnets with a rated pull force of 1200 kg each. Is it even possible or will I fail and end up
with an expensive pile of magnet crumbles? Neodymium magnets are not toys! Do not handle magnets of the shown size
unless you know and accept all the risks involved. So why would I even attempt this? It mostly started as a standing joke
in the comments on my videos where I combine already large neo magnets. I never took it seriously and just dismissed
it with a “I’ve only bought one of them.” “Send me a second one and I’ll consider it – not” The years went on and the
thought started haunting me. Is it even possible?
Can I do it? For some of my other experiments
– like testing the magnetic reactions of elements – It would be useful to have a magnet
with a massive far-reaching magnetic field. The dream of a 6×4″ neo magnet was born. Then in autumn 2017 magnetportal.de donated two
monstrous magnets to my channel. One of them a 6×2″… Since then I’ve been planning how to
combine the two magnets in a controlled way. Neodymium magnets are brittle
like a ceramic dinner plate and with a ton of pull force – literally – this project is more difficult and
dangerous than you might think. It takes some preparation to avoid
chipping or even shattering the magnets. I have used wedges made of
hardwood in the past but they are not solid enough for larger magnets.
I hope these felling wedges made of plastic are the solution. They are
designed to be solid and not pop out when the weight of a tree
is pushing down on them. But my worry is not them falling out. Getting them stuck in the pinch
between the magnets is the problem. So off with the spikes… So far it’s been a one-man project
to combine my magnets. Not this time. I know my limits
and have called in a secret helper. He has absolutely no experiences
in handling powerful magnets but will more than double our
forces in men versus magnets. After some practice
it is time for the real deal. The first magnet is placed with
its south pole facing upwards. And the heavy wedge is placed over the magnet. I double-check the polarity and notice
the low gauss reading above the wedge. 25 cm or 10″ from the magnet it is only 1% of the gauss reading
flat at the surface of the magnet. Nicely low for safety but I still secure the wedge
with some old belts to make sure the bottom
magnet isn’t suddenly set free. The other magnet is placed
in a carrier to make sure we never have our fingers between the
magnets – again with the south pole upwards. ‘Perfect.’ After an easy lift on it is time for the slide. One man pulling the wedge and one man pulling the
magnet in opposite direction and trying to keep everything
centered over the bottom magnet. First sound is the bottom magnet
lifting up from the ground. The magnets are now pinned
on each side of the wedge. After reaching the plastic part
the forces are now too high for this to work. Even with the secret helper pulling
so hard that everything – including me – slides across the carpet
the magnets are not coming any closer. Is this where it ends? Time to come up with a plan B. We decided to turn it into a tug of war. Two Jutlandic vikings at one end
and the two magnets at the other. ‘Yes!’ By a flaw in my design it is possible
for the wedge to go off-center. So of course it happens… Off-camera we managed to center
the wedge a millimeter at the time with a lot of twisting and manhandling. Time for the final pull! However, it didn’t last long
before something shook us… The noise was loud and unexpected! Still not sure what made this sound?
Your guess is as good as mine. After checking nothing bad has happened
we carry on. What a relief… The magnets are not stuck on the wedge
and no humans or magnets were harmed. Only damage is a bite to
one of the felling wedges. A tiny bit is stuck between the magnets
but it is so flattened that it isn’t a problem. The magnets aren’t perfectly centered
but with an awkward technique I manage to align them. Once all of the edges are aligned
the magnets will not move anymore. They feel like welded. So here it is:
a 6×4″ neodymium magnet. More compact and safer to store
than the two separate magnets and with a solid magnetic field. As you can tell, my table isn’t all wood… I’m happy that this experiment ended so well. I enjoy learning about science by
performing experiments for my videos and learning by doing is
the most satisfying approach. If you are like me but don’t
have the stuff needed or don’t want to take
the risks often involved I have a nice tip for you. Brilliant.org is a problem-solving
website where you can learn to think like a scientist by performing
your own thought-experiments. Their active hands-on learning style will give you a deep understanding
of the various terms and concepts involved. One of their principles of learning
that I strongly agree with is ‘effective learning allows for failure.’ In my videos I not only perform experiments I am also prepared for them to fail. There was no guarantee that I could have
successfully combined these huge magnets. They could have shattered in the end but then we would’ve learned
more about their limitations. If you believe in active learning
and embracing failure… I highly recommend you go to
Brilliant.org/Brainiac75 and sign up for free. The first 275 using the link will even get
20% off the annual premium subscription. Then you can go crazy with the experiments
without any warnings from me. And speaking of experiments:
In my next video I will test this new magnet. How well does it perform in the tests
I used in my previous video? Experiments like bending a saw from a distance Max pull force on a paper clip
and inversing a compass… Can you guess from how far away
it will invert a compass? Let me know in the comments
and in the next video I’ll give a shout-out to the one
with the closest guess. Thank you for watching. Thanks to magneportal for the magnet
and brilliant.org for sponsoring the video. And a special thanks to my helper. What a collaboration this has been! Remember to subscribe and click the
notification bell or you may miss the next video… Bye for now!

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