How to Play Badminton


How to Play Badminton. For anyone who’s ever wondered why people
are swatting an odd-looking object back and forth across a net, here’s the lowdown. You will need Two or four players A badminton
court A net A shuttlecock and badminton rackets. Step 1. Set up a court by establishing boundaries
of 44 feet long by 17 feet wide for a singles game and 44 feet by 20 feet for a doubles
game. Place a net in the middle, with the top 5
feet off the ground. Step 2. Know the object of the game, which is similar
to tennis: Opposing players with rackets hit the shuttlecock back and forth over a net
trying not to let it hit the ground. Shuttlecocks, which are also called shuttles
or birdies, come in two types: Cork-based with feathers, and plastic with a rubber base. Step 3. Know what constitutes a fault, or an error. A fault is made when the shuttlecock lands
outside the boundary lines, does not clear the net, hits the ground before being returned,
or makes contact with a player’s body or clothing. Step 4. Start with a coin toss; the winner chooses
a side of the court and decides if they want to serve first or not. Step 5. The game begins with the player serving underhanded
from the back of the court on their right side diagonally across the court to the other
team. If the shuttlecock doesn’t clear the net or
lands outside the service area, the other team scores a point and gains serve. Serve from the right when your score is even,
left when it’s odd. Players only get one chance to serve, unless
they miss the birdie completely, or the birdie touches the net on its way across – which
is called a let. Step 6. Whoever wins each rally wins the point, and
whoever gets to 21 points wins a game. If players are tied at 20, the team with the
first two-point lead wins. If the scores go to 29 without anyone attaining
the two-point lead, the first team to reach 30 wins. The match is won by the best two out of three
games played. Did you know Badminton is the world’s fastest-paced
racket sport, with the shuttlecock flying across the net at speeds of almost 200 miles
per hour.

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